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Fraud and cyber crime national statistics

We've published reports, referrals and outcomes for fraud and cyber crime broken down by Home Office police forces and other agencies in the UK for 1 April 2016-31 March 2017

Find out more about this data

ForceReferred CrimesTotal OutcomesJudicial OutcomesNon-Judicial Outcomes
Avon and Somerset90856452
Bedfordshire62618616170
British Transport Police26491365126
Cambridgeshire58344478366
Cheshire52018011169
City of London (incl. funded units)2,744957647310
Cleveland21426887181
Cumbria17032392231
Dedicated Cheque and Plastic Crime Unit93473215
Derbyshire509783250533
Devon and Cornwall1,05534133
Dorset316802173629
Durham18316151
Dyfed Powys191301119182
Essex1,69029524271
Gloucestershire269463123340
Greater Manchester5,9721,7832961,487
Guernsey3000
Gwent26733952287
Hampshire1,0342902873
Hertfordshire1,0731,165211954
Humberside526400127273
Isle of Man3000
Jersey2000
Kent1,3052,8953262,569
Lancashire1,292265105160
Leicestershire79243447387
Lincolnshire36837767310
Merseyside1,7541,081631450
Metropolitan24,2778,9939438,050
Norfolk46065461
North Wales265463108355
North Yorkshire19413112
Northamptonshire7461,098325773
Northumbria5311,265311954
Nottinghamshire5851,214248966
Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI)469549197352
South Wales510929237692
South Yorkshire906536100436
Staffordshire1,344803115688
Suffolk4771019
Surrey7981,1601141,046
Sussex9261,2932181,075
Thames Valley1,899630209421
Warwickshire26721595120
West Mercia388562288274
West Midlands3,8761,2361261,110
West Yorkshire1,774805145660
Wiltshire479945243702
Total65,65937,4598,21429,245
ForceReferred CrimesTotal OutcomesJudicial OutcomesNon-Judicial Outcomes
Garda Siochana5000
Police Service of Scotland1,4761730173
Royal Gibraltar Police1000
Total1,4821730173


Terms used in the data

  • National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) is part of the City of London Police. It analyses information and crimes reported to Action Fraud to develop lines of inquiry and then sends out crime packages (disseminations) to police forces and other law enforcement agencies. NFIB also carries out a range of activities to disrupt websites, bank accounts and telephone accounts used to enable fraud and provides crime prevention advice to the public, industry and other partners.
  • There are a number of different types of judicial outcome as defined by the Home Office (see Section H).

How we choose which crimes are sent to forces

Several factors are considered when a dissemination is made. This includes whether or not there are viable lines of enquiry and the threat, risk and harm to the victim. Crimes are disseminated to police forces for investigation primarily based on the location of the suspect, where there are viable lines of enquiry to be made and when officers have the best opportunity to detect and deter. However, all reports are stored for further analysis so that if new information is discovered it can be used as part of any future investigation.

Discrepancies in outcomes between forces

Fraud and cyber crime are complex crimes that take time to investigate and, where possible, prosecute. It can also happen from outside the UK, which adds a further degree of complexity in trying to track down offenders.

There is not a direct link between the number of crime disseminations and the number of outcomes returned. Disseminations and disposals often won't occur in the same reporting period due to the length of time required for fraud investigations. It's also possible for the number of outcomes to be greater than disseminations, when disseminations made before April 2016 are returned as outcomes within the 2016/17 period.

Police forces are mandated to provide outcome data, but other agencies are not subject to Home Office Counting Rules and therefore do not report outcomes to the City of London Police.

How the City of London Police supports police forces

Action Fraud and the NFIB take the equivalent of 4,000 days or £1,997,760 per month off of UK police forces' demands by recording and analysing fraud reports nationally rather than at a local level. Unlike most other crimes, fraud and cyber crime is often committed by criminals who never come into contact with their victim, and around half of all fraud and cyber crime comes from abroad. A national reporting service means the UK can better identify investigate and detect fraud and cyber crime. 

Investigation and enforcement are not the only ways to fight fraud; taking steps to prevent it from happening in the first place is just as important. Reports made to Action Fraud can lead to the disruption of telephone lines and websites linked to fraudulent activity, or working with banks to request the closure of accounts linked to crime. From April 2016 to March 2017 the NFIB disseminated 46,019 reports for further action on intelligence, prevention or victim care and submitted 170,856 requests to partners to close bank accounts, websites and phone numbers suspected of facilitating fraud. 

Police forces are required by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabularies to provide outcome data, but other agencies do not necessarily report back to the City of London Police, which is why some of their outcomes are recorded as zero. All data taken is from the period of 1 April 2016-31 March 2017.

Regional Organised Crime UnitReferred CrimesTotal OutcomesJudicial OutcomesNon-Judicial Outcomes
East Midlands 0000
Eastern 1000
London 0000
South East 0000
South Western 0000
Wales 0000
West Midlands 1000
Yorkshire & Humberside 0000
Total2000

Terms used in the data

  • National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) is part of the City of London Police. It analyses information and crimes reported to Action Fraud to develop lines of inquiry and then sends out crime packages (disseminations) to police forces and other law enforcement agencies. NFIB also carries out a range of activities to disrupt websites, bank accounts and telephone accounts used to enable fraud and provides crime prevention advice to the public, industry and other partners.
  • There are a number of different types of judicial outcome as defined by the Home Office (see Section H).

How we choose which crimes are sent to forces

Several factors are considered when a dissemination is made. This includes whether or not there are viable lines of enquiry and the threat, risk and harm to the victim. Crimes are disseminated to police forces for investigation primarily based on the location of the suspect, where there are viable lines of enquiry to be made and when officers have the best opportunity to detect and deter. However, all reports are stored for further analysis so that if new information is discovered it can be used as part of any future investigation.

Discrepancies in outcomes between forces

Fraud and cyber crime are complex crimes that take time to investigate and, where possible, prosecute. It can also happen from outside the UK, which adds a further degree of complexity in trying to track down offenders.

There is not a direct link between the number of crime disseminations and the number of outcomes returned. Disseminations and disposals often won't occur in the same reporting period due to the length of time required for fraud investigations. It's also possible for the number of outcomes to be greater than disseminations, when disseminations made before April 2016 are returned as outcomes within the 2016/17 period.

Police forces are mandated to provide outcome data, but other agencies are not subject to Home Office Counting Rules and therefore do not report outcomes to the City of London Police.

How the City of London Police supports police forces

Action Fraud and the NFIB take the equivalent of 4,000 days or £1,997,760 per month off of UK police forces' demands by recording and analysing fraud reports nationally rather than at a local level. Unlike most other crimes, fraud and cyber crime is often committed by criminals who never come into contact with their victim, and around half of all fraud and cyber crime comes from abroad. A national reporting service means the UK can better identify investigate and detect fraud and cyber crime. 

Investigation and enforcement are not the only ways to fight fraud; taking steps to prevent it from happening in the first place is just as important. Reports made to Action Fraud can lead to the disruption of telephone lines and websites linked to fraudulent activity, or working with banks to request the closure of accounts linked to crime. From April 2016 to March 2017 the NFIB disseminated 46,019 reports for further action on intelligence, prevention or victim care and submitted 170,856 requests to partners to close bank accounts, websites and phone numbers suspected of facilitating fraud. 

 

Police forces are required by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabularies to provide outcome data, but other agencies do not necessarily report back to the City of London Police, which is why some of their outcomes are recorded as zero. All data taken is from the period of 1 April 2016-31 March 2017.

Partner AgencyReferred CrimesTotal OutcomesJudicial OutcomesNon-Judicial Outcomes
Business Innovation and Skills0000
Charity Commission3000
Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs3000
Insolvency Service56000
Medicines and Healthcare Products Reg. Agency0000
Ministry of Justice21000
National Crime Agency74000
Office of Fair Trading0000
Other308000
Serious Fraud Office42000
Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA)10000
Financial Conduct Authority (FCA)9000
Trading Standards3,459000
United Kingdom Border Agency5000
Total3,990000

Terms used in the data

  • National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) is part of the City of London Police. It analyses information and crimes reported to Action Fraud to develop lines of inquiry and then sends out crime packages (disseminations) to police forces and other law enforcement agencies. NFIB also carries out a range of activities to disrupt websites, bank accounts and telephone accounts used to enable fraud and provides crime prevention advice to the public, industry and other partners.
  • There are a number of different types of judicial outcome as defined by the Home Office (see Section H).

How we choose which crimes are sent to forces

Several factors are considered when a dissemination is made. This includes whether or not there are viable lines of enquiry and the threat, risk and harm to the victim. Crimes are disseminated to police forces for investigation primarily based on the location of the suspect, where there are viable lines of enquiry to be made and when officers have the best opportunity to detect and deter. However, all reports are stored for further analysis so that if new information is discovered it can be used as part of any future investigation.

Discrepancies in outcomes between forces

Fraud and cyber crime are complex crimes that take time to investigate and, where possible, prosecute. It can also happen from outside the UK, which adds a further degree of complexity in trying to track down offenders.

There is not a direct link between the number of crime disseminations and the number of outcomes returned. Disseminations and disposals often won't occur in the same reporting period due to the length of time required for fraud investigations. It's also possible for the number of outcomes to be greater than disseminations, when disseminations made before April 2016 are returned as outcomes within the 2016/17 period.

Police forces are mandated to provide outcome data, but other agencies are not subject to Home Office Counting Rules and therefore do not report outcomes to the City of London Police.

How the City of London Police supports police forces

Action Fraud and the NFIB take the equivalent of 4,000 days or £1,997,760 per month off of UK police forces' demands by recording and analysing fraud reports nationally rather than at a local level. Unlike most other crimes, fraud and cyber crime is often committed by criminals who never come into contact with their victim, and around half of all fraud and cyber crime comes from abroad. A national reporting service means the UK can better identify investigate and detect fraud and cyber crime. 

Investigation and enforcement are not the only ways to fight fraud; taking steps to prevent it from happening in the first place is just as important. Reports made to Action Fraud can lead to the disruption of telephone lines and websites linked to fraudulent activity, or working with banks to request the closure of accounts linked to crime. From April 2016 to March 2017 the NFIB disseminated 46,019 reports for further action on intelligence, prevention or victim care and submitted 170,856 requests to partners to close bank accounts, websites and phone numbers suspected of facilitating fraud. 

 

ForceFRAUD DASHBOARDSCYBER DASHBOARDS
Avon and SomersetJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
BedfordshireJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
CambridgeshireJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
CheshireJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
City of London June 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
ClevelandJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
CumbriaJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
DerbyshireJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
Devon and CornwallJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
DorsetJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF) 
DurhamJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
Dyfed PowysJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
EssexJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
GloucestershireJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
Greater ManchesterJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
GwentJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
HampshireJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
HertfordshireJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
HumbersideJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
KentJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
LancashireJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
LeicestershireJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
LincolnshireJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
MerseysideJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
MetropolitanJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
NorfolkJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
North WalesJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
North YorkshireJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
NorthamptonshireJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
NorthumbriaJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
NottinghamshireJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI)June 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
ScotlandJune 2017 (PDF)Not available
South WalesJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
South YorkshireJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
StaffordshireJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
SuffolkJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
SurreyJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
SussexJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
Thames ValleyJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
WarwickshireJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
West MerciaJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
West MidlandsJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
West YorkshireJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
WiltshireJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)
NATIONALJune 2017 (PDF)June 2017 (PDF)